The Forgiven – first-look review

Fiennes and Chastain loathe each other well, convincingly bickering about whatever emerges from the other’s mouth while still ensuring enough care to suggest a history. This man is the mainstay of John Michael McDonagh’s The Forgiven, an adaptation of Lawrence Osborne’s 2012 novel about a loveless couple spading through the fallout of a fatal accident. It’s unclear who The Forgiven is for, though. McDonagh prods at the uber-wealthy, allowing his A-listers to jockey for the title of Worst Debauchee, but he does more to scold their materialism than the broader…

A new film season explores the relationship between autism and cinema

Non-autistic actors portrayed the condition in stories mediated through non-autistic characters, often a haggard sibling in the likes of Rain Man and Molly, the latter about attempting to “cure” someone of their autism via experimental brain surgery. The decision to include Mulholland Drive, perplexing as it may seem, is in keeping with the season’s aim of exploring perspectives on cinema adjacent to neurodiversity. Most of the season is comprised of similarly themed material, including Mick Jackson’s 2010 biopic of autistic rights activist Temple Grandin, and Jean-Pierre Daniel, Fernand Deligny and…

Rose Plays Julie

Lawlor and Molloy rarely put a foot wrong, so excited to see this new one. Rose Plays Julie Review by David Jenkins @daveyjenkins Share this Directed by Christine Molloy Joe Lawlor Starring Aidan Gillen Ann Skelly Orla Brady Anticipation. Rose discovers she was adopted, and wants to know who her real parents are. Enjoyment. The pair’s most ambitious and provocative film yet. In Retrospect. You deliver the poison. Would make a fascinating, ethically thorny double feature with Promising Young Woman. Ellen’s trauma is transferred to Rose and exacerbated by the…

Encounter – first look review

It’s a shame considering how strong Pearce’s debut Beast was, which felt like a more nuanced approach to mental instability. Time and time again we see schizophrenia used as a plot device in films, usually painting people with the condition as unstable and dangerous to those around them. The question hangs over the film as to whether Curtis’ premonitions are real or a symptom of mental illness; it’s a beautiful, haunting end-of-days drama that regularly springs to mind whenever I have a nightmare or see a particularly overcast sky. Violent…

The Mad Woman’s Ball – first-look review

While there are brief scenes of discomfort and abuse sprinkled throughout the film, the director’s framing never seems intrusive – something that is important to balance when tackling stories about institutional exploitation. Published 13 Sep 2021 Share this Sound designers Cyril Moisson, Alexis Place, and Cyril Holtz fill scenes with intense echoes and the screams or laughs of the institutionalized women Eugénie now lives with. A young socialite named Eugénie (Lou de Laâge) begins to see spirits, which causes her to experience brief panic attacks. When her father learns of…