Surge

Whishaw’s breakthrough leading role was admittedly as an olfactorily-driven killer in 2006’s Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, but the star persona he has developed since has tended to concern reserved or even overwhelmingly polite individuals, one of them a friendly little bear in a duffel coat. It’s not a totally unfair comparison, particularly given that the bulk of the breakdown narratives and crime sprees in both films take place over the course of a single day. His emotionally distant parents, meanwhile, are on edge in his presence. In spite…

Luca Guadagnino will reteam with Timothée Chalamet on Bones & All

Chief among them is new casting news, which includes the detail that the upcoming project will reunite the Call Me By Your Name director with his one-time star Chalamet for the first time since the movie that rocketed them both to a new tier of fame. Share this Words Charles Bramesco @intothecrevasse Share this Share this It’s been a big week for Timothée Chalamet, which began Monday with the announcement that he’d portray a young William Wonka in an origin film about Roald Dahl’s famed candy tycoon. While that press…

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It

Unless it’s the Warrens in danger, it’s hard to care. Share this Share this The third instalment in the horror franchise gives us a lot of Ed and Lorraine Warren, but not nearly enough Satan.The third instalment in The Conjuring franchise (which has already spawned spin-offs The Nun and the Annabelle series, with another one based around The Crooked Man in the works) is the first not to be directed by modern horror master James Wan, who is well accustomed to accidentally launching lucrative horror franchises (see Saw; Insidious). Not…

Frankie

While this sometimes means the action feels more theatrical than cinematic, here it makes Frankie’s overwhelming isolation all the more impactful. Enjoyment. The film does end on a poignant note, largely thanks to Huppert and Gleeson, as well as Dickon Hinchliffe’s gentle score which imbues the final moments with a sense of impending loss and defiant hope. A tad disappointing from Sachs, whose characters usually have more humour, honesty and heart. A Portuguese sojourn with Ira Sachs sounds charming. For a truly bittersweet summer break, you’re better off with the…

Dinner in America

Published 26 May 2021 Share this This is the only predictable part of Dinner in America. If his ire is expressed in brash and unpleasant fashion, well, sometimes conformity has to be challenged. A director who can shock, but can he make a decent coming-of-age film? At Beth’s suburban Detroit home, Simon snogs Beth’s mum (Back to the Future’s Lea Thompson), trashes the family dining room and theatrically torches their garden hedge. Patty refuses to grass him up and soon Simon inveigles his way into her house and family life.…

A new documentary explores the Beatles’ enduring relationship with India

The Beatles and India will receive its world premiere at BFI Southbank on Sunday 6 June as part of the UK Asian Film Festival. The film begins by recounting how the Beatles first came to India in February 1968, seeking creative inspiration, spiritual guidance and, in Harrison’s case, a crash course in sitar playing from the virtuoso composer Pandit Ravi Shankar. Published 26 May 2021 Share this At the Maharishi’s ashram on the outskirts of Rishikesh in northern India, the band studied Transcendental Meditation alongside the likes of Donovan, Mia…

Cruella

Great gowns, beautiful gowns. As Estella uncovers the truth about the incident from her past that has haunted her for a decade, she unlocks the wicked side of her personality – that’s right, Cruella –   and must utilise this to exact her revenge. A lot worse than it thinks it is. Cruella ultimately wants to have it both ways, suggesting its anti-heroine is both a product of her tragic circumstances and also bad for the sake of it. Enjoyment. Share this Share this Emma Stone plays the fur-loving fashionista…

What does Amazon’s buyout of MGM mean for movie-lovers?

What does Amazon’s buyout of MGM mean for movie-lovers? In the movie business, new management doesn’t tend to waste time making their presence known. James Bond was the biggest name involved, but there’s a hitch there as well, as the Broccoli family still holds absolute authority over the character and must approve all decisions pertaining to 007, even as MGM owns fifty percent of the property. From this fertile new tract available to Amazon, any number of wonders could grow. Bond’s the big name, but the ramifications extend far beyond…

First Cow

A simple story of a gentleman baker that channels the danger and excitement of early capitalist endeavour. The lovely term “pocket symphonies” is often used to describe the music of the Beach Boys, and it also applies to Kelly Reichardt’s cinema. For a long time I wondered whether I had overrated the film, to the extent that I was a little scared to rewatch it. Cookie and King-Lu have other plans, as they sneak into his meadow at night and extract the milk for their own nefarious means, namely producing…

Time cracks and splinters in the first trailer for Last Night in Soho

Share this Words Charles Bramesco @intothecrevasse Share this Share this After more than a year of waiting beyond the film’s initial release date, Edgar Wright loyalists will be relieved to see a proper trailer for his latest film Last Night in Soho at long last. Time cracks and splinters in the first trailer for Last Night in Soho Anya Taylor-Joy and Thomasin McKenzie bleed into one another, possibly literally, in Edgar Wright’s psycho-thriller. The trailer begins with a present-day fashion student played by Thomasin McKenzie, spending her class sessions sketching…

Poo jokes and a visit from Prince – The making of Drop Dead Fred

Over the years, many people have told me they picked up on it and I’ve found the film has a very therapeutic value. Once on set, however, he and de Jong worked together to flesh out Fred’s world. One of those elements had to be cut – the landing or the drinking.” Despite being known for his live-wire performance style, de Jong says that Mayall controlled himself during the shoot, with minimal off-the-cuff moments. Carol said it had to have ugly, yucky, vomit-y colours – but in a pleasant way.…

Earwig and the Witch

But there are signs that Gorō is letting go of the past – the yellow Citroën 2CV from Hayao Miyazaki’s debut feature, The Castle of Cagliostro, gathers dust in the witch’s basement. Tales of Earthsea and From Up on Poppy Hill are criminally underrated. Earwig and the Witch Review by Lillian Crawford @lillcrawf Share this Directed by Gorō Miyazaki Starring Dan Stevens Richard E Grant Taylor Henderson Anticipation. Used to the luscious hand-drawn animation of Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, it’s easy to see why the kneejerk reaction for many…

Chloé Zhao’s style gets Marvelized in the first trailer for Eternals

We know that The Eternals are a group of eons-old super-beings who help keep peace through the cosmos on a universal scale (their ranks including Gemma Chan, Angelina Jolie, Kumail Nanjiani, Brian Tyree Henry, and Barry Keoghan, among others), but beyond that, it’s anyone’s guess. The de-saturated, smeary color, people-standing-in-a-line scene blocking, and the brief snippet of Whedonesque banter at the tail end all evoke the assembly-line model of production we’ve come to know (and, for many, dread) over the past decade. The extensive outdoor shooting in the trailer recalls…

Timothée Chalamet will play a young Willy Wonka in a new prequel

Either way, we’re bound for a return to the world of pure imagination. Details of plot are still up in the air, though the Deadline item does mention that good old Charlie Bucket will not have a presence in the new film, with Wonka taking center stage. While the films with Gene Wilder and Johnny Depp elided this much, Dahl made sure to canonically specify that Wonka had taken up the so-called “white man’s burden”. Timothée Chalamet will play a young Willy Wonka in a new prequel He’s set to…

In praise of Masked and Anonymous

We had to sustain ourselves on fragments of oblique gossip that would flow from the editorial pipeline, each one making the film sound ever more strange and intriguing. Almost like a try-hard mis-interpretation of Dylan lore. This wasn’t a compilation of new material, more a set of radical, latin-inflected remixes of top “best of” cuts, some by other bands and others by Dylan himself. On my initial viewings, I chalked it up as a likeable “putting on a show” folly, worthwhile if only for Dylan’s wonkily enunciated line-readings (“You gotta…