Tom Petty, Somewhere You Feel Free: The Making of Wildflowers

In Retrospect. The reality is that ‘Wildflowers’ was made in a state of emotional turbulence. Share this Share this This newly unearthed chronicle of the making of the American singer-songwriter’s favourite album is a gift for fans.Tom Petty has always seemed to imbue the sound of Central America in the sort of way a Wrigley’s chewing gum ad or a pair of Levi’s 501s might conjure images of stars and stripes. Because you have to connect with your soul,” the man himself confides over grainy tour bus visuals. Studio time…

Language Lessons – first-look review

It feels almost voyeuristic to watch this on a laptop. By nature of both characters having to talk directly into the camera at almost all times, often really close up so you can see every micro-expression crossing the actors’ faces (even in a minimised window), she’s able to craft moments of uncomfortable intimacy. Morales and Duplass also attempt to reckon with the gender, racial and class disparities and power imbalances within Adam and Cariño’s relationship, although those efforts are more messily handled. Although Language Lessons may not directly mention the…

Denis Villeneuve: ‘I’m obsessed by the idea that humans can evolve’

He was into the idea that the salvation of humanity could be by a dance with nature instead of the domination of nature, and there was already a seed of that in the novel that is very important. The protagonist of Dune, Paul Atreides, will eventually lead desert-dwelling religious fanatics in a jihadist crusade that inevitably evokes the iconography of al Qaeda or Daesh. I travelled to the States, I travelled to most parts of the world. I wanted to approach that landscape with a different scope, and be more…

Dune

And that, in itself, is no small achievement. The important scenes are allowed to play out in a way that allows for a slower, more satisfying reveal of character motivation, as well as adding necessary ballast to the emotional foundations for later in the saga. Published 19 Oct 2021 Share this The director’s now patented landscape tableau style – in which small figures are engulfed in epic, painterly vistas – helps to create one of the most visually breathtaking and boldly idiosyncratic blockbusters to drop down the chute in a…

10 independent gems from the BFI London Film Festival 2021

Quant In the 1960s, Mary Quant pioneered a fashion revolution on the streets of Britain, bringing mini skirts, flashy eye makeup and colourful tights – all now ubiquitous to the decade – to the masses. The latest in a niche canon of films set on film sets, Sun’s film is part industry-satire, part social-commentary about the unhappy marriage between money and art. We picked out some under-the-radar gems at this year’s LFF that should be coming to a screen near you soon. All My Friends Hate Me Returning from a…

Aaron Sorkin goes behind the scenes of I Love Lucy in the Being the Ricardos trailer

There’s a genuine fascination with the intricate process of production and pressure-cooker environment of a live set evident in such shows as Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip and The Newsroom – as well as Being the Ricardos, his latest directorial feature and a return to the soundstages he holds so dear. Javier Bardem co-stars as Arnaz, her husband on-screen and off-, though their home life bears little resemblance to the good-natured version of it they beam into America’s living rooms. Share this Words Charles Bramesco @intothecrevasse Share this Share…

Discover the fear and disillusionment of this cabin fever horror

So by 2011, the two were regular collaborators, even if Toyoda’s rapid rise as a filmmaker in the early 2000s was cut short in 2005, just before the release of Hanging Garden, by his arrest for drug possession and the ensuing media scandal which would see him blacklisted. Soon there will be more visitors: his brothers Kenta (Ken Ken) and Yuki (Yôsuke Kubozuka), and his sister Mikana (Mayû Kusakari). To avoid this fate, he has severed his links to society, and lives off what he, himself and alone, hunts and…

The French Dispatch

Published 18 Oct 2021 Share this Concerning the foreign bureau of the fictional Liberty Kansas Evening Sun newspaper, The French Dispatch follows three separate storylines gathered together within the supplement’s final issue, to be released upon the passing of its founder and editor-in-chief, Arthur Howitzer Jr (Bill Murray). Share this Share this Wes Anderson’s New Yorker-inspired anthology film is a meticulously-crafted love letter to the art of magazine journalism.Wes Anderson’s tenth feature film seems tailor-made to appeal to movie lovers who also appreciate the art of print journalism. Nescafier (Stephen…

Olivia Colman grapples with motherhood in The Lost Daughter trailer

Anchored by a trio of extraordinary performances from Olivia Colman, Dakota Johnson, and Jessie Buckley, the adaptation of Elena Ferrante’s novel pays acute attention to the tribulations of womanhood, and motherhood in particular. And for just the price of a ticket, you won’t find a cheaper way to take the Greek beach getaway of your dreams. Published 18 Oct 2021 Share this Olivia Colman grapples with motherhood in The Lost Daughter trailer She’s joined by Dakota Johnson and Jessie Buckley in Maggie Gyllenhaal’s outstanding directorial debut. Today, the first trailer…

The Penguin is an empowering anti-hero for trans people like me

Published 17 Oct 2021 Share this A week without death threats is as rare as a sunny day in Gotham. The Penguin doesn’t want to be normal – he wants to be heard. The Penguin delivers his most astute observation early on in Batman Returns. “The Penguin teaches us to cast aside the burdens of conformity in our pursuit of a meaningful existence.” With so few trans journalists employed by prominent outlets, trans people do well to follow The Penguin’s lead when engaging the media, who often frame our lives…

ear for eye

A fiery, confrontational missive from one of the finest dramatic writers in the business. Anger, confusion and regret dominate the discourse, as we flit between the UK and US with various different pairings and contexts. This sequence rolls out like a one-act play (recalling David Mamet’s similarly-styled ‘Oleanna’), in which Lynch’s character presses and stands her intellectual ground in her questioning of the professor’s methods and ethics in a contentious paper about a school shooting. The staccato rhythms of the dialogue delivery lend the sequence a musicality that belies the…

Venom: Let There Be Carnage

The rapport between Eddie and Venom is so effortless it’s easy to forget he’s playing both roles, and it’s gratifying how easily Hardy slips into the persona of a sweaty, weirdo loser considering his smouldering off-camera persona. While critics savaged the film, the populace at large turned out in droves (perhaps as a result of the critical savaging) and become the sixth most profitable film of the year, with roughly a $700 million return on Sony’s initial investment. Share this Share this Tom Hardy returns as the reporter with an…

Lashana Lynch: ‘A lot of nations need to own up to their history’

But when you get down to the meat and bones of it, it is a white man not handling a Black woman in the way that she deserves, and not giving her the voice to speak her truth in the way that he can because he was born white. Not just for a few months because Black Lives Matter was in the news, but actually reaching the heads of studios, the producers, the filmmakers that have the power to fund scripts like this which have been sitting on their shelves…

In defence of Halloween: Resurrection

Yet despite its flaws though, Resurrection is arguably the most innovative film in the entire series. The six contestants, each of them sporting headcams and laden with quirks xeroxed from the teen slasher renaissance of the late ’90s, are tedious murder fodder. Even Sara, the film’s Final Girl, serves as a regrettably dull counterpart to the iconic Laurie, with her only true confidant being an online pen pal named Deckard who tunes into the broadcast at a party later that evening. Even Freddie, whose kung fu moves immortalised him as…

The Velvet Underground

Haynes understands this, and so it’s no accident that he starts this unconventional yet revelatory documentary about an unconventional yet revelatory band with a quote from Baudelaire: “Music fathoms the sky”. They are both not-quite-biopics, and each takes a sideways, yet pointed perspective on the legacies of two generation-defining icons: David Bowie and Bob Dylan. I’m Not There, meanwhile, viewed Dylan through a kaleidoscope, casting six actors to reveal a shapeshifter often at odds with himself and his art. It’s the music, and where it takes you, what it opens…