It Must Be Heaven

In Retrospect. Just as he brings his heritage with him wherever he goes, so too does he carry his creative point-of-view. Share this Share this Palestinian filmmaker Elia Suleiman goes in search of parallels to his homeland in this charming road movie.“Nazareth” and “I am Palestinian” are the only words spoken aloud by ES, the Buster Keaton-ish alter ego portrayed by writer/director Elia Suleiman in It Must Be Heaven, and they’re not chosen idly. Suleiman is an exotic creature in New York, where this conversation takes place, a stranger in…

Elia Suleiman: ‘I was a street kid who became a bum – but a thinking bum’

Thankfully, the film has a few more gags than the rhetoric I’m spinning just now. But Keaton, Tati, all those references, I only caught up with them after I started making my own films. It Must Be Heaven was still turned down by several festivals, perhaps because they thought the Nazareth section was too short and maybe there wasn’t enough action. Read the LWLies Recommends review. Inevitably, you lose your family, you lose your connection to the place you’re from, then you start to feel that you’ve reinvented yourself as…

Nicolas Cage goes searching for his porcine pal in the Pig trailer

The actor must get a lot of scripts – and due to fiscal constraints in his own life, he takes on more of them than most – but it’s impossible to predict which ones will pique his interest and make it to theaters. A friend with advance screener access mentioned to me that the film focuses on the darker side of the haute-cuisine industry in a more grounded capacity, rather than being the out-there midnight-movie oddity the public may have presumed. But the trailer isn’t in the accented, borderline phantasmagorical…

Watch the world exclusive trailer for The Most Beautiful Boy in the World

Watch the world exclusive trailer for The Most Beautiful Boy in the World The star of Luchino Visconti’s Death in Venice reflects on his life in this melancholy documentary. Published 17 Jun 2021 Share this Named after the Italian director’s somewhat bombastic description of his then 15-year-old lead at the film’s premiere in 1971 – Visconti famously scoured all of Scandinavia to find the perfect blonde-haired, blue-eyed boy for the role of Tadzio – Kristina Lindström and Kristian Petri’s documentary puts Andrésen centre stage as he reflects on his life…

The Reason I Jump

Among them are two young adults in Virginia, Benjamin McGann and Emma Budway, who relay their personal thoughts through an alphabet board, as well as Amrit Khurana, an artist from Noida who has found success in expressing herself through line drawings, and Jestina Penn-Timity, a girl living in Sierra Leone where being autistic carries a horrible social stigma. While this is ultimately a film designed for neurotypical audiences – the intensity of Ryan’s sound design may prove overwhelming to neurodiverse individuals susceptible to loud audio stimuli – I find myself…

LWLies Sixties Presents… Cléo from 5 to 7 reimagined

Full details to follow. As part of 99 Days of Design, a celebration of the power of design from 99designs by Vistaprint, we commissioned Sofia-based street artist, illustrator and designer Evgeny Todorov to reinterpret Varda’s feminist masterpiece in the form of an alternate poster. After that, I started sketching the design ideas based on the screenshots I already made. I was looking for the moments that I felt I wanted to put in a frame. “I really enjoy the film and the art of Agnès Varda,” says Todorov. The idea…

In praise of Ghost World’s Bollywood-inspired opening credits

“I saw a short clip of it on a VHS tape and I really loved it and decided I needed to use it in Ghost World somehow,” Zwigoff told Dazed. The film may be readily associated with bottle-green hair, passive-aggressive art classes and the general malaise of the early 2000s, but its offbeat energy is most effectively characterised by its first needle drop. Share this Words Saffron Maeve @saffronmaeve Share this Share this You know that feeling when you graduate high school and spend the summer hating everything and everyone…

In the Earth

In the Earth is a welcome dose of mind-bending weirdness from Wheatley and suggests that he works best when directing from his own material and working with a local cast. Share this Share this Ben Wheatley goes back to basics in this understated yet supremely effective 21st century folk horror.An odd bird, Ben Wheatley. A grand recovery after the spectacular misfire that was his last film, Rebecca. Enjoyment. After being attacked and robbed by unknown assailants, Martin and Alma are approached by a hermit named Zach (Reece Shearsmith) who offers…

Ben Wheatley: ‘I’ve always been wary of the woods – they can kill you’

It’s fine if you’re doing historical drama, or if it’s Bond because he’s always a man out of time, so it doesn’t matter. Reece has a commitment to an understanding of the full breadth of horror, and his taste is very wide. When was that a crime? I think that you have got to take that on board; people have had a global generational experience. That was a great advantage because a lot of time was saved. You know, what the public sees at the cinema is usually two or…

Luca

The director’s love for this setting – a portmanteau of various Italian coastal towns as well as a reference to Studio Ghibli – is evident everywhere, to the point where Luca feels like a tourism ad for a town that doesn’t exist. Authentic, personal and surprisingly low stakes. The film focuses squarely on the relationship between fellow sea monsters Luca and Alberto (voiced by Jack Dylan Grazer, greatly amusing in his false confidence) as they explore the human world, becoming obsessed with the idea of buying their own Vespa. Luca…

20 years on, can cinema teach us anything new about 9/11?

Whether new documentaries about 9/11 are strictly necessary depends on your stance on documentaries in general. As long as people vow to never forget 9/11 and its aftermath, there will always be new stories to tell. Part of the success of One Day in America lies in its exploitation of the audience’s preexisting knowledge. With the events of 9/11 so frequently replaced in both fiction and documentary cinema, can anything new be revealed 20 years on? But for those who see documentary first and foremost as a storytelling medium, the…

Alexander Payne’s next film will reunite him with Paul Giamatti

After the fascinating misstep of his previous film – which, credit where it’s due, gave us a dancing Udo Kier – Payne is returning to his wheelhouse for his next outing, in verboseness and discontentment and neurosis. The unlikely group shares some “comic misadventures” during two snow-blanketed weeks, and ultimately comes to realize that “none of them is beholden to their past,” as the Deadline bulletin has it. As Payne himself says in the Deadline item, “I think it’s a matter of time before [Paul Giamatti] gets his Oscar.” Published…

This new documentary is Afghanistan’s answer to Boyhood

Nevertheless, this is a fascinating example of protracted filmmaking and a refreshing counter narrative to those which typically surround the War on Terror. Still, it is common to hear filmmakers freely admitting to intervention, which Grabsky and Sharifi do when Mir and his family move to Kabul and are unable to find work. His parents send him to school, although he soon has to drop out to support his family by working the land. The documentary follows eight-year-old Mir as he and his family carve out a humble existence among…

How Basic Instinct turned the erotic thriller on its head

Far from being defeated, she survives and triumphs, with Nick’s future, even his very life, left entirely in her wandering hands. Her latest novel details a very similar murder, suggesting either that she, or an obsessive reader, is the killer – and as Detective Nick Curran (Douglas) investigates, we quickly notice that he is in every respect outclassed by his quarry, a multi-millionaire heiress with a Berkeley degree in literature and psychology (magna cum laude) who is much smarter and infinitely richer than her pursuer, and altogether defter at the…

A new documentary about Kids serves as a stark cautionary tale

Justin Pierce, whose chiselled features bear an eerie resemblance to River Phoenix, didn’t make it past 25 (tragically hanging himself in Las Vegas after his girlfriend miscarried), while Harold Hunter’s more gradual decline into despair and drug abuse offers a reflective coda for Harris, who ultimately managed to turn his life around. The film that emerged as Kids evidently bore little to the group’s own experiences on the street, with Clark egging them on with a titillation and darkness that appears forced and inappropriate. Casting Pierce, Hunter and other non-actors…