We Met in Virtual Reality – first look review

He shot the whole thing using a VRC lens camera so that the viewer will experience the stories within the world of social VR, rather than outside of it. Sonically, there’s a variety of music that heightens the viewer’s experience as we are taken on the characters’ journeys. In a pandemic era, such things are precious and worth savouring. And for that alone, it’s an enjoyable ride that’s worthy of our time. We Met in Virtual Reality – first look review The first feature doc to be shot entirely inside…

Nothing Compares – first look review

She refuses to become the packaged pop singer her label wants. As we are reminded later, abortion is only legalized in 2015, almost 30 years after her label try (unsuccessfully) to force her to abort her own child for the sake of their cash investment. As Peaches, one of several figures interviewed in the film attests, the moment is pure performance art. It remains one of the most exhilarating moments of live music television. Her response: to shave her head. There are powerful moments throughout this likeable and very watchable…

Fresh – first look review

Published 22 Jan 2022 Share this Noa seems to get over this quite quickly, because hey – he might be a cannibal, but Steve’s got his own home and he’s cute, which are two qualities hard to ignore in the millennial hellscape that is contemporary romance. Gibbs) cares so much about her, given that Noa shows precious little in interest in anyone but herself. A slick, beautifully-produced film, Fresh benefits from some excellent interiors (say what you want about psychopaths, they can decorate the hell out of a lair) but…

When You Finish Saving the World – first look review

Ziggy attempts to bond with the girl he has a crush on (Lila, played by Alisha Boe) by demonstrating his activist credentials, but Lila sees through him, and even when she gives him a chance, Ziggy’s self-absorbed nature strikes again. Eisenberg is smart as a storyteller to correct this self-righteous streak by demonstrating how Evelyn and Ziggy’s actions – ultimately guided by what they want rather than the people they’re trying to help – are harmful, confronting the ‘white saviour’ trope that has plagued society and popular culture for years.…

George MacKay: ‘I find the development of morality fascinating’

“Therefore, you can unpick ideas in a way that you can’t with something that is happening right now. At what point do you step in, if something hasn’t happened yet and if you can’t efficiently legitimise your actions purely on just a feeling?” These pressing political themes give Munich: The Edge of War its modern sensibility, something that is expressed in MacKay’s performance of idealistic, if misguided, youthful energy. Is it personal day-to-day change? It’s a strange confession to hear from an early-career actor in an industry that awards showy…

Belfast

In an effort to create a crowd-pleasing story of youthful exuberance in the face of adversity, the director seems afraid to think big, and Belfast suffers for it. Share this Share this Kenneth Branagh’s semi-autobiographical drama about The Troubles is undermined by its depthless and apolitical tone.After spending a few years punching out lacklustre studio blockbusters, Kenneth Branagh has opted for a more personal project in Belfast, a drama based on his own experiences growing up in the Northern Irish capital amid flaring tensions between Catholics and Protestants. Uninspired, too,…

Memory Box

Falling short, too, is any substantial interrogation of the effects of the Lebanese Civil War: for Maia, personally, or her generation as a collective. Set in present day Montreal, Maia (Rim Turki) is single mother to teenage daughter Alex (Paloma Vauthier). When a box containing Maia’s old diaries, albums and cassettes is mailed to her by an old friend – to whom she had entrusted these treasures when she fled Lebanon in the late ’80s – Alex decides to pore over her mother’s keepsakes in private. Still, there are so…

Josephine Decker pivots to YA lite in the trailer for The Sky Is Everywhere

While it’s easy to see this teamup with A24 and Apple TV as the latter half of the “one for me, one for them” paradigm for Decker, there’s no reason to assume she won’t bring the sum total of her talents to bear on this job, kid stuff as it might appear. All the while, her journey takes metaphorical form in music, as the clarinetist tries to regain the joy required to make her art. Share this Words Charles Bramesco @intothecrevasse Share this Share this Though she’s primarily known for…

Claire Denis, Peter Strickland and Andrew Dominik will present new films at the 2022 Berlin Film Festival

After a virtual festival in 2021, it’s no surprise the team are keen to get back to the cinema – and they’ve secured an intriguing line-up full of familiar names as well as some new faces. As if that wasn’t enough, a new Lucretia Martel short, entitled North Terminal, will also premiere. Special presentations will include Quentin Dupieux’s Incredible But True, Imitation Game director Graham Moore’s The Outfit, and Dario Argento’s first directorial effort in 10 years, Dark Glasses. Perhaps the most high profile title in the competition is Claire…

A Journal for Jordan

We then see the couple fall in love, cope with the strain of distance, along with how Dana learns to cope with the emptiness caused by her beloved’s untimely death. Denzel set the bar high after successfully bringing a Pulitzer Prize-winning play to screen. A Journal for Jordan Review by Marina Ashioti Share this Directed by Denzel Washington Starring Chanté Adams Michael B Jordan Anticipation. Solely relying on Dana’s subjective and romanticised memories, it makes sense that the narrative would paint Charles with such idealistic brushstrokes, but by denying him…

Brian Wilson: Long Promised Road

While having lunch at a diner, he mentions offhand that he feels like he hasn’t talked to a real friend in three years, a shattering divulgence he nonetheless makes in an unaffected voice obscuring his emotion. And so the new documentary from Brent “No Relation” Wilson arrives with the promise of a more candid, intimate look at a man reluctant to bare the innermost parts of himself. It’s revealing, if only of how opaque Wilson is. After years of reclusion and instability, he’s gotten back on an even keel in…

Bong Joon-ho has lined up Robert Pattinson for his next sci-fi epic

When he dies, his body is regenerated with most of its memory intact, Mickey having already undergone this procedure six times before. Bong Joon-ho has lined up Robert Pattinson for his next sci-fi epic The new film loosely adapts Mickey7, a to-be-released novel about a clone colonizing an ice-world. Now one of the world’s foremost directorial talents, he’s returning to the Hollywood that Snowpiercer and Okja never really conquered for another English-language project on a greater scale than ever. An exclusive from Deadline broke the news that Bong will go…

See Sidney Poitier in rare behind-the-scenes photos from In the Heat of the Night

See Sidney Poitier in rare behind-the-scenes photos from In the Heat of the Night They’re part of Park Circus and MGM’s upcoming Poitier tribute, which includes screenings of the film. But they’ll have to work together if they want to bring the killer to justice, a job that gradually builds a begrudging mutual respect between the two at-odds men. Film distributor Park Circus has teamed with MGM to pay homage to Poitier’s memory in the most fitting way of all: by bringing his masterly work back to the masses. Poitier…

Nightmare Alley

A ripping, brutal yard, but maybe some of that gorgeous text needed to be subtext. The first half is filled with dusty-jewel tones, vaudevillian ghoulishness and Terrence Malick-esque landscapes. It’s a feast of a film, with architectural precision and lush texture in every shot. But some of his visual metaphors can be a little heavy-handed, as the dualities spelled out in mirror and shadow often hold for a beat too long, which becomes increasingly frustrating in a film which takes its own sweet time. His new film, Nightmare Alley, appeals…

Cicada

Enjoyment. Themes of sexual abuse and the intersections of race and sexuality are slightly embroiled in a melodramatic conflict about authenticity, but never dealt with in an overly heavy-handed manner. For an indie, Cicada has its fair share of distracting cameos. The two leads draw on autobiography and are said to bring raw, lived-in qualities to Ben and Sam. The sound design doesn’t distract from the film’s awkwardness either, with dialogue much lower in the mix compared to the sudden and loud needledrop cues. Cicada Review by Marina Ashioti Share…